The thesis should represent a thorough knowledge of Buddhism and demonstrate the ability to engage with primary source material for research purposes. By August 1st of the year after enrolling in the MA program (approximately 11 months after enrollment), the student must submit a Thesis Proposal (approx. 1,800 words), developed in collaboration with the Thesis Supervisor, for approval by the Graduate Committee at CBS. In order to proceed to the third semester of study it is a requirement that this committee approves the thesis proposal. The length of the thesis is restricted to a maximum of 25,000 words. The defense of the thesis is carried out in examination by the Thesis Supervisor, and an External Examiner appointed by the Graduate Committee at CBS as per KU policy.

This course is a specialized study in the topic of the thesis during which the student is familiarized with the relevant primary and secondary literature in the area of study. The student is guided in the textual study by the Thesis Supervisor and, during weekly meetings, the wide variety of methodological approaches to the field of Buddhist Studies such as philology, historiography, philosophy, textual criticism, sociology, anthropology, art history, etc. are discussed in terms of their relevance for the academic study of Buddhism in general and especially in relation to the topic chosen for the thesis.

Prerequisites

Successful completion of BSTD 502: Advanced Buddhist Readings III – Tibetan II

This course is a study in a relevant area of the larger topical background within which the student’s thesis will be located. The topic of study is chosen by the student in consultation with the Thesis Supervisor. The course is an opportunity for the student to acquire a broad knowledge of the historical, social, and religious background for the thesis topic in order to properly contextualize the narrower field within which the actual thesis research takes place. The course is taught as weekly 3-hour seminar sessions where the literature and cultural history of the thesis topic is discussed and analyzed in plenum with the Thesis Supervisor and other students.

Prerequisites

Successful completion of the fist year of the MA Program (30 credits).

This is a series of specialized courses in Buddhist philosophy and scriptural interpretation. The aim of this series is to deepen the knowledge of complex Buddhist philosophical topics and their relations to the broader field of Buddhist studies. Course readings are primarily classical Indian treatises and their Indo-Tibetan commentaries in areas of classical Buddhist philosophy, such as Abhidharma, Madhyamaka, and Yogācāra thought. While studying specialized topics of Buddhist philosophy, students are encouraged to relate the material to larger perspectives within the context of contemporary philosophical issues.

Prerequisites

None.

This is a series of specialized courses in Buddhist philosophy and scriptural interpretation. The aim of this series is to deepen the knowledge of complex Buddhist philosophical topics and their relations to the broader field of Buddhist studies. Course readings are primarily classical Indian treatises and their Indo-Tibetan commentaries in areas of classical Buddhist philosophy, such as Abhidharma, Madhyamaka, and Yogācāra thought. While studying specialized topics of Buddhist philosophy, students are encouraged to relate the material to larger perspectives within the context of contemporary philosophical issues.

Prerequisites

None.

This is a series of specialized courses in Buddhist philosophy and scriptural interpretation. The aim of this series is to deepen the knowledge of complex Buddhist philosophical topics and their relations to the broader field of Buddhist studies. Course readings are primarily classical Indian treatises and their Indo-Tibetan commentaries in areas of classical Buddhist philosophy, such as Abhidharma, Madhyamaka, and Yogācāra thought. While studying specialized topics of Buddhist philosophy, students are encouraged to relate the material to larger perspectives within the context of contemporary philosophical issues.

Prerequisites

None.

The Research Seminars are courses on research method and contemporary issues in modern scholarship. Discussed in these courses are the methodological issues involved in academic research of religion in general and Buddhism in particular. The courses introduce the student to the historical development of the study of religion while making use of specific case studies to analyze scholarly methods of particular influence to the study of Buddhism. The seminars are taught in weekly 3-hour plenary sessions requiring active student participation as an important means for developing the ability of the graduate student to engage in critical scholarship and research.

Prerequisites

None.

The Research Seminars are courses on research method and contemporary issues in modern scholarship. Discussed in these courses are the methodological issues involved in academic research of religion in general and Buddhism in particular. The courses introduce the student to the historical development of the study of religion while making use of specific case studies to analyze scholarly methods of particular influence to the study of Buddhism. The seminars are taught in weekly 3-hour plenary sessions requiring active student participation as an important means for developing the ability of the graduate student to engage in critical scholarship and research.

Prerequisites

None.

The Research Seminars are courses on research method and contemporary issues in modern scholarship. Discussed in these courses are the methodological issues involved in academic research of religion in general and Buddhism in particular. The courses introduce the student to the historical development of the study of religion while making use of specific case studies to analyze scholarly methods of particular influence to the study of Buddhism. The seminars are taught in weekly 3-hour plenary sessions requiring active student participation as an important means for developing the ability of the graduate student to engage in critical scholarship and research.

Prerequisites

None.

These courses are readings undertaken by students individually with a weekly 3-hour plenary session. The texts read in this course are normally classical Mahāyāna texts from the Sanskrit and Tibetan literary traditions but may also include other genres such as, for example, historical, political, medical and polemical literature. The purpose of the courses in Advanced Buddhist Readings is to provide students with the ability to read complex philosophical material in the primary source languages for Buddhism in the Himalayan context.

Prerequisites

BSTD 503: Advanced Buddhist Readings II – Sanskrit I

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